Tagged: orbit

© 2011 Hilda Perez

This is the super “perigee moon” — the biggest in almost 20 years, taken last month on March. This celestial event is far rarer than the famed blue moon, which happens once about every two and a half years. The last full moon so big and close to Earth occurred in March of 1993.
Full moons look different because of the elliptical shape of the moon’s orbit. When it’s at perigee, the moon is about 31,000 miles (50,000 km) closer to Earth than when it’s at the farthest point of its orbit, also known as apogee.

Nearby perigee moons are about 14% bigger and 30% brighter than lesser moons that occur on the apogee side of the moon’s orbit. This full moon rises in the east at sunset and looks especially big at that time because of what’s known as the “moon illusion.” For reasons not fully understood by astronomers or psychologists, low-hanging moons look unnaturally large when they beam through trees, buildings and other foreground objects, according to NASA.

© 2011 Hilda Perez

Share

© 2011 Hilda Perez

DID YOU KNOW: The sun rose two days early in Greenland this year! An example of coming change within the Sun’s activity and orbit and its effects from radiation and gravitational pull to earth, which will cause greater intensity in earth changes from volcano activity, earthquakes, tsunamis, climate changes, magnetic pull and polar reversal.

© 2011 Hilda Perez

The most powerful solar flare in four years exploded over the sun late Monday February 14, 2011, according to NASA.
Such so-called coronal mass ejections can pose radiation threats to astronauts and overwhelm Earth’s magnetic field, potentially disrupting satellite communications and power grids on the ground.
The most powerful explosions in the solar system, solar flares occur when magnetic field lines on the sun cross, cancel each other out, then reconnect. As the Sun reaches a peak in solar flare activity this year and into 2012, expect greater effects to the earth’s climate, tsunamis, earthquakes, and volcanic activity.
These “explosive reconnections” release huge amounts energy as heat—in this case, a short blast measuring roughly 35 million degrees Fahrenheit (19 million degrees Celsius), according to physicist Dean Pesnell, project scientist for NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO.
Source: National Geographic Daily News

Check out SOHO, the Solar & Heliospheric Observatory, is a project of international collaboration between ESA and NASA to study the Sun from its deep core to the outer corona and the solar wind.

Share